Walking Matters

Godalming & Haslemere Ramblers


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Hankley Common

It was a cold sunny morning—ideal for our five mile walk on Hankley Common.

Twenty-two arrived for the start in the car park in the common on the Greensand Way NW of Truxford Farm. Some said that it was difficult to find. However, it’s easy to find if one looks at a map and uses the grid reference. It’s those who rely on sat navs and post codes who struggle. Post codes cover areas; grid refs pinpoint locations. Lack of the relevant map is not a problem now thanks to the web.

The first part of the walk was on the GSW to the Lion’s Mouth, along Kettlebury Ridge and back to the GSW by Houndown Bottom. The second was along the GSW, then north to Yagden Hill near the golf course and back to the car park on bridleways.

There are so many paths on Hankley Common that it’s easy to get lost. Fortunately, our leader knew his way round.

Map: OS X 145

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The Devil’s Punch Bowl & Haslemere

This walk (nine miles) was a repeat of the one last Wednesday. Today it was less cold and less muddy; there were fewer in the group (eleven) and the pace was quicker.

We set off from the NT car park and headed north down a stony path into the Punch Bowl. After a junction with a bridleway on our left we turned right down a footpath. This crossed a stream and passed near the old youth hostel before joining a byway. Here we turned left, passed Gnome Cottage, crossed a cattle grid and then branched right on a NT track that led uphill. At the top we turned right on a narrow path through heather that went diagonally uphill to a byway where we turned right and headed south. We stayed on the byway, or parallel to it on paths, to its end by The Royal School. Here we turned right on a lane, joined the Greensand Way and followed this to Haslemere where we stopped for lunch.

Our return to Hindhead was via the GSW, Weydown Common, Keffolds Farm, Hurthill Copse, the site of the Temple of the Four Winds, Gibbet Hill and the byway along the ridge of the Punch Bowl.

Map: OS X 133


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Brook & Thursley

Our six mile walk this morning started from Brook near the Dog & Pheasant. It was a cold day so all (29) were keen to start walking.

We gathered on the green opposite the pub and set off across the A286 to turn right on a footpath across a soggy field to Screw Corner Road. Here we turned left to the crossroads at Bowlhead Green, used a bridleway to bypass a section of Rutton Hill Road, took a footpath to Emley Farm, headed NW past a pond, turned left on a footpath past Hole Farm, crossed the A3 by a subway, joined a lane by Upper Highfield Farm and continued on it to Thursley where we stopped for coffee in the churchyard in sunshine.

Suitably refreshed we returned to Brook via the Greensand Way.

On the route we passed a series of steps and several kissing gates that had been installed over the last few years by the group’s footpath working party.

Map: OS X 133


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The Devil’s Punch Bowl

This morning’s five mile walk started from the same place as yesterday—the NT car park in Hindhead. Eighteen arrived for the walk. We headed north down steep steps into the bowl, joined a byway, passed Little Cowdray Farm, turned west at Hedge Farm, passed Ridgeway Farm, turned south on a bridleway, walked through Vanhurst Copse and Highcombe Copse, passed the memorial to the Robertson Brothers and returned to the car park.

Map: OS X 133


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Hindhead & Haslemere

The Devil’s Punchbowl in Hindhead has become increasingly popular since the opening of the Hindhead tunnel in 2011. The NT car park there, the start of today’s nine mile walk, was remarkably full at 9 am.

Twenty-three arrived for the walk. It was a cold, grey, damp day with low cloud. This gradually cleared so the views were better than expected.

Map: OS X 133


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Farncombe & the River Wey

The leader of this morning’s 5½ mile walk took us (19) from Meadrow car park along back streets and alleyways of Farncombe, across Broadwater Park, through Peasmarsh and on footpaths to the River Wey. From here we followed the towing path back to Broadwater Park and returned to the car park.

Map: OS X 145


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Selborne figure of 8

Trekking poles were an advantage on today’s 9½ mile walk. They were useful as stabilisers and as probes to locate firm ground on muddy stretches of footpaths.

There was a short slippery slope on the morning route which the leader warned could be a problem. She pointed out a longer detour to avoid it. One person took up the challenge and soon ended up flat on his face. Not to be beaten he tried again and reached the top. Another had an attempt but was defeated. He took the detour rather than risk a second muddying. The leader had a go, curious to see if she could overcome the lack of friction. She succeeded but only because one of the men who had reached the top via the detour gave her a hand from above.

The morning walk was on footpaths SE of Selborne. The route was to Sotherington Farm, Le Court Hanger, High Wood Hanger and Galley Hill. The afternoon route went NW along Selborne Hanger, over the B3006, past Wick Hill Cottages and Wick Hill Farm. It joined the Hangers Way and stayed on it back to Selborne.

Map: OS X 133